Tag Archive: uwe d’rose


The Beyond are presently Rob Warner and Uwe D’Rose. Rob Warner started The Beyond in 1986 when the band originally comprised Rob Warner, Matt Russel and Nick Ralph. They released Episcense in 1987, and tracks from this still appear on YouTube. According to their Bio (see below), several CD’s were released and then the band stopped making music. A couple of years ago The Beyond was reinvigorated through the collaborative work between Rob Warner and Uwe D’rose when they released a new album called Exploring Imagined Spaces.

According to Rob Warner ‘every track includes a base frequency that effects the listener in a different way’. More on this later. It’s all about soothing, pleasant atmospheres. If you want to relax, listen to Exploring Imagined Spaces.

The album begins with 528hz Ascension. The gentle sound of waves sussurating from the speakers introduce this track. A synth voice gently flows over them while a light melody supports the ensemble. About half-way through a short classic ‘Berlin Style’ synth melody makes a brief appeareance, picking up the pace slightly before fading. Bright and airy. Following on from this is Memories Like Dust which begins with a melancholy piano. Light melodies gently wash across the background resulting in a sad, quite evocative tune that epitomises the ephemeral nature of memories and how flimsy they become over time.

The third track, Under Ancient Skies comprises a wonderful bit of guitar work that evokes a mystical Eastern paradise. Uwe D’Rose’s guitar work dominates this track with long drawn out echoing melodies with an unmistakable Eastern flavour. A male voice from long ago softly chants phrases from some forgotten language. The Alchemist, which follows on from this is great. Music like drops of ambient fall around you, bouncing around and gently settling . The essence of this track is ‘relax’. It truly flows with such a relaxing style that you’ll want to close your eyes and smile. It enourages laziness đŸ™‚ Just lay back and put your feet up.

The Innerworlds is a beautiful uplifting ambient track that echoes with a bright scattering of minimal guitar, sparkling and lazy. The Big Freeze is a reserved piece of music – slow and contemplative, hinting at sadness while Flo, the final track, darts brightly here and there to a light tempo with not a care in the world.

Overall this is a true synthesis of keyboards and guitar. They work so well together that the whole is a masterpiece of sound. An amazing ambient album that uses Solfeggio frequencies as indicated by the title of the opening track.  These tones were supposedly used centuries ago in Gregorian and Sanskrit chants (though there is no concrete evidence for this – if anyone does have any references let me know and I’ll add them), and were believed to impart spiritual blessings during religious ceremonies. One thing is for certain, the overall effect is one of peace and relaxation. Get it. This album is guaranteed to work magic.

Buy the album from the dedicated online shop and you get an extra 25 minutes of music comprising The Innerworlds, The Big Freeze and Flo.

The Beyond are the other side of Harkonnen. You can read a short bio of The Beyond here where you will find further information and photos.

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Harkonnen : Harkonnen

Harkonnen’s eponymous album is a gem. There are two versions available. The version for sale on the Harkonnen website includes nearly an hour of bonus material taken from a rare live performance. Buy it anywhere else and you’ll just get the studio tracks.

Harkonnen are Rob Warner and Uwe D’rose. Rob plays synths and Uwe plays guitars. These two guys have produced an amazing album where all the music flows around a common theme. When asked, Uwe says that both he and Rob were in one mind as to what the finished product would sound like. It shows. This is a well performed, well laid out album. Rob Warner was responsible for the technical and production duties and has done an excellent job. Uwe describes Harkonnen as the ‘other side’ of Beyond.

Harkonnen opens with a scorching track called Rise Of The Machines that employs some amazing gutar work. The riffs used here are deep and menacing, the sort of sound you would associate with the implacable will of a mechanised construct. Awesome. Age Of The Machines is similar – powerful music with gritty lead guitar, but which is a celebration of all things industrial and robotic.

Ghosts In The Bitstream uses a soft lead to evoke a sense of loss – lead guitar creating a melancholic drone. The sound, though, is still within the Harkonnen recipe. (R)age Of The Machines starts gently then drops you back into a harsh industrial environment with plenty of twisted lead and awesome riffs.

All Human Is Error makes an unequivocal statement. Humans? Who needs them!

The Last Robot and The Final Sunset have a certain melancholy. The drones in The Final Sunset evoke a beautiful image of the sun setting, but you know that it will never be appreciated by the mechanised society over which it sets.

The Machines (Live) is a showcase of what lead guitar can sound like when done well. The lead overlays a rich synthesised background and the two harmonise very well. When you listen to the live tracks on the extended version of the album (remember – only available from the Harkonnen website), you may not realise that what you are hearing is the work of Rob Warner on his own. He plays everything. There are three live tracks, two longform at about 20mins (The Man In The High Castle Pts 1 and 2), separated by a shorter track named The Machines which is rich with plenty of guitar work. The Man In The High Castle Pt 2 begins with robotic murmurings and quickly becomes quite dark, lending it a tense atmosphere. This is maintained when a rythmic pulse gently creeps up on you, and the voices occassionally become louder and more ominous. The track is a showcase for deep minimal mechanical noises put together to create a powerful dark industrial soundscape. Man In The High Castle (Part 2) live is original dark ambient synth style. This is a classy piece of music and ends the album beautifully.

Rob and Uwe have worked together on various projects for 35 years and it shows in this album. The elements harmonise very well, the live performance is excellent, and the album has a common theme throughout. When you hear any particular track from the album you can most definitely recognise it as being ‘Harkonnen’. It varies from full-on melodic lead, awesome synths and gentle drone. There are classic elements of electronica here too, particularly in All Human Is Error, where the voice reading the charge appears to emanate from some kind of Orwellian mechanoid. The album is inexorable. The tracks march on, effortlessly overcoming all obstacles. Production is excellent, especially on the live tracks – everything is clear and stands out.

I’ve played this album many times and it really appeals to me. If you enjoy classic lead guitar, great riffs, marvellous and original synth sounds, and if you prefer your albums to play around a common theme, then this is definitely for you. I can’t recommend this enough!

Rob Warner is presently working on three other projects: The Beyond (With Uwe), BROADKAST (an industrial dance project) and the record label/sample library Ambient Source. He is also part of an as yet unnamed elctro-acoustic ethnic folk project. Uwe D’rose is the guitarist in Landmarq who have just released a double CD and will be playing various UK dates this year.